Vancouver Condo Smarts: How much is enough for strata's contingency fund?

Condo Smarts: How much is enough for strata's contingency fund?

The key to planning is to ensure the years ahead will be appropriately funded to reflect the projected renewals in your depreciation report, and you approve sufficient funds in the annual budget to meet all of your operations and service requirements.

The contingency reserve fund is intended to fund a variety of circumstances. PHOTO BY GETTY IMAGES

Article Sidebar

TRENDING

  1. U.S. Open: Djokovic disqualified after hitting lineswoman with ball

  2. Ozzy Osbourne was at his 'calmest' when he attempted to kill Sharon during drugs binge

  3. COVID-19: American family sent back to U.S. after caught vacationing in Vancouver

  4. Disqualification is worst moment of Djokovic's career, says Becker

  5. Several boats sink during Trump parade in Texas

Article content

Dear Tony:

Our 25-year-old apartment building recently completed several planned major upgrades. Our roofing system was replaced, we had an elevator overhaul, and our boiler was upgraded. All of this depleted our contingency fund down to 25 per cent of our operating fund, or just under $100,000.

Our next major upgrades are planned for 2028 to start the replacement of our exterior doors and windows, and we approved a significant increase in contingency contributions starting this year to cover those estimates.

Three of our fiscally conservative council members suggest that we should have a special levy to top up the contingency fund by another $250,000, to ensure we have sufficient emergency funds, claiming 25 per cent of the operating fund is the only minimum amount.

The legislation does not actually state what the minimum is? How do we assess what is sufficient in our funds?

— Carolyn B., Vancouver

Advertisement

 
STORY CONTINUES BELOW
 
This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content continued

Dear Carolyn:

The Strata Property Act has a simple formula to determine the minimum contingency contribution each year as part of the annual operating budget, but not the minimum balance.

As in your case, if the balance of the contingency drops below 25 per cent of the annual operating budget, the strata corporation in the next fiscal year must contribute at least 10 per cent of the annual operating budget value to the contingency fund. If your annual budget is $400,000 and your contingency balance is below 25 per cent or below $100,000, the contribution for your operating budget in the next fiscal year is a minimum of 10 per cent of the proposed operating budget for the next fiscal year. If the next year’s budget is $400,000, the minimum contribution, in addition to the operating budget, is $40,000.

The contingency reserve fund is intended to fund a variety of circumstances: planned renewals recommended by the depreciation report, emergency repairs including emergency costs for insurance renewals, common insurance deductible costs, and approved costs for projects and costs approved by a three-quarter vote of the owners at a general meeting.

Minimum funding is simply bad planning and deferral of the real value of strata fees. There will be times when a strata corporation significantly reduces its funds in cycles of repairs and maintenance or emergencies. The key to planning is to ensure the years ahead will be appropriately funded to reflect the projected renewals in your depreciation report, and you approve sufficient funds in the annual budget to meet all of your operations and service requirements.

Advertisement

 
STORY CONTINUES BELOW
 
This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Article content continued

The days of “keep your strata fees low, so it doesn’t affect property values” are history. Underfunded strata corporations are routinely identified as undermaintained properties. Low strata fees result in low contributions to the contingency fund, which end up being frequent special levies for deferred repairs that are often delayed by defeated votes of the owners. This can result in more costly repairs and an increased risk of insurance claims or serious implications on the cost or limitations of insurance renewals.

Many communities across B.C. have implemented their deprecation reports actively for renewals planning and funding and have not required special levies for over 10 years, all due to prudent planning.

The additional administrative costs for collections of unpaid special levies consume a significant amount of strata council and management time and resources that may otherwise be dedicated to the more critical tasks of maintenance, renewals, and operations.

What is the right amount of funding? Start with your depreciation report. Look at what you will need over the next 10 to 30 years. Assess those values every year, and that’s your starting place to determine your contributions.

In ageing buildings, the immediate costs may be out of everyone’s reach, but even a 50 per cent increase in your contributions will make a significant difference in 10 years.

Tony Gioventu, Executive Director CHOA

Tony Gioventu is executive director of the Condominium Home Owners Association. Email tony@choa.bc.ca

MORE ON THIS TOPIC

Under an agency agreement, the strata corporation’s funds are held in trust in the name of the strata corporation.

Condo Smarts: Strata management oversight involves standard safeguards

Property owners and council members have the legislated obligation under the Strata Property Act to maintain and repair common property and common assets.

Condo Smarts: Maintenance issues — pay now or pay more later

Share this article in your social network

Advertisement

 

THIS WEEK IN FLYERS

Article Comments

COMMENTS

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

 
 
 
 
 

All Comments

 
 
 
 
 

Start The Conversation

 
Comments:
No comments

Post Your Comment:

Categories
The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.